An Exclusive Look at United’s New Polaris Product

Photo: United

In June, United’s CEO Oscar Munoz officially launched their new business class product called Polaris. The completely redesigned product aims to give passengers a consistent product from airport to aircraft.


Designed in partnership with Acumen Design Associates and PriestmanGoode and manufactured by Zodiac Seats in the UK, each United Polaris seat will offer direct aisle access, a 180-degree flat-bed recline, and up to 6 foot 6 inches of bed space. Polaris also features a gel-cooled pillow and numerous high-quality amenities that increase customer satisfaction on routes highly frequented by business travelers. In addition, the new product also features an inflight walk-up snack bar.

Polaris isn’t just an inflight product, but also extends into the airport with an exclusive lounge. On December 1st, 2016, United will unveil the first lounge at Chicago O’hare, and will later launch more at hubs such as Newark, Washington-Dulles, Los Angeles, Houston, San Francisco, and Tokyo Narita, to name a few. These lounges will feature dining, drinks, day beds, showers, and various other amenities.

United plans to officially introduce the product in December on their new Boeing 777-300ER, followed by the 787-10 and A350-1000. Later, the airline plans to add the product on the 767-300 and 777-200.

In addition to full aisle access and an extended lie flat bed, the seats are easily reclinable with the movement of a dial. The seats also feature a marble side table for drinks and other items. Lastly, they are also equipped with full power outlets, a do not disturb sign, and a tablet equipped tray table.

Watch the video:

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Ryan Ewing

Ryan is a young avgeek who enjoys all aspects of aviation. He has had experience in almost every field of aviation. From writing articles to actually flying, Ryan has done it all!

He has about two hours of flying "under his belt" and he has a collection of 40 plus airplane models, plus airline memorabilia, collectibles and hundreds of aviation photos. Now, Ryan mainly writes articles and collects avgeek stuff. He's had his head in the clouds for more than 16 years and will always look up when he hears a jet roar. In addition to writing and editing for AirlineGeeks, he volunteers as a Travelers Aid at Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C.
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  • ricport

    I generally like UA, but this is yet another example of them being too little, too late. Compared to the ME3 or SQ,, this offering is significantly inferior. If any of the US legacies expect to be competitive for international business travel dollars, they need to step up their game considerably.