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A SkyUp Airlines 737-800 (Photo: Anna Zvereva, CC BY-SA 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons)

Ukrainian Airline SkyUp Takes Delivery of a New Boeing 737-800

Ukrainian low-cost carrier SkyUp Airlines took delivery of a new Boeing 737-800 on Tuesday, becoming the tenth aircraft of this type to join its fleet.

The airplane, with the manufacturer’s serial number (MSN) 40249, completed its first flight in July 2011. From August of that year, it operated for FlyDubai and in 2019 it joined the fleet of South African carrier Comair. Now, it is registered as UR-SQM so it can start flying for its new operator.

The aircraft is equipped with winglets, which will be replaced by split scimitar winglets during the coming autumn. The new wing devices will improve the aircraft’s aerodynamic performance and enable a further reduction in fuel consumption. Consequently, they contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere.

With the new acquisition, SkyUp has two Boeing 737-700s and ten 737-800s in operation. The aircraft are configured in single-class cabin disposal and can carry up to 149 and 189 passengers, respectively.

To continue in spite of everything

Since the beginning of the war following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the company has had to adapt its model to try to survive the total suspension of scheduled commercial flights in the country.

During the first days and weeks of the conflict, SkyUp flew Ukrainian citizens to Israel and Portugal from Chisinau, Moldova, and from the Polish cities of Warsaw and Lublin. It also helped transport international humanitarian aid to airports near the Ukrainian border.

It then offered aircraft and crew leasing services to other airlines outside Ukraine on wet-lease agreements and operated for the tour operator Join UP!, a commercial partner of the airline.

With the country’s airports still closed and airspace restricted for civil operations, the provision of on-demand services with aircraft housed in other territories presents itself as one of the most viable options for generating revenue. Of course, the desire of the company’s employees and management is to return to operating on Ukrainian soil.

This story was originally published by Agustin Miguens of Aviacionline in syndication with AirlineGeeks. 

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  • Born in Argentina, with a regional focus and global reach, Aviacionline is the Spanish-speaking leader in Latin America.

Ryan Ewing
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