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Sections of Boeing’s 787-10 head to the final assembly facility in Charleston (Photo: Boeing)

Boeing’s First 787-10 Dreamliner Prepares for Final Assembly in Charleston

The largest variant in Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner program is coming together at the company’s manufacturing facility in North Charleston, SC. On Thursday morning, the aft-body and mid-body sections of the aircraft arrived from Nagoya, Japan via Anchorage.

The arrival was celebrated by Boeing employees as the sections were moved into the facility for assembly.

Unlike other versions of Boeing’s Dreamliner, the 787-10 will exclusively be made in North Charleston. The 787-8 and 787-9 are currently manufactured in both Everett and Charleston. Final assembly of the aircraft will begin in a few weeks.

With the mid-body and rear sections of the aircraft on site, Boeing is now awaiting the nose section which will be delivered from Spirit Aerospace Systems in Wichita, KS. The aircraft is scheduled to begin a year-long series of test flights in 2017.

Sections of Boeing's 787-10 move to the final assembly building in Charleston with celebrating employees (Photo: Boeing)

Sections of Boeing’s 787-10 move to the final assembly building in Charleston with celebrating employees (Photo: Boeing)

Final designs for the 787-10 were completed on Dec. 2, 2015. The aircraft has a range of 6,430nm and can accommodate approximately 330 passengers in a two-class configuration, which is comparable to Airbus’ A350-900XWB. The extended Dreamliner is approximately 18 ft longer than its 787-9 counterpart, with a 224 ft length. The 787-10 will be powered by either the GEnx or Trent 1000 engine, depending on customer preference.

There are currently 154 firm orders for the 787-10, with Singapore Airlines being the launch customer in May 2018. The first 787-10 (line number 528) will likely serve as one of the three test aircraft.

Pushed by Emirates and Qantas, Boeing initially launched the 787-10 program in 2013 at the Paris Air Show. The manufacturer selected Charleston as a perfect place to build the aircraft. The 1.2 million square ft. 787 final assembly building employs thousands of local residents, making it a major employment center within the local community and for the company.

Check out this video by the Charleston Regional Business Journal:

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  • Ryan founded AirlineGeeks.com back in February 2013 and has amassed considerable experience in the aviation sector. His work has been featured in several publications and news outlets, including CNN, WJLA, CNET, and Business Insider. During his time in the industry, he's worked in roles pertaining to airport operations and customer service while pursuing a bachelor's degree in Air Transportation Management from Arizona State University. Ryan has experience in several facets of the industry from behind the yoke of a Cessna 172 to interviewing airline industry executives.

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