Photos: What It’s Like Inside JetBlue’s New A320 Interior

A mockup of JetBlue's refreshed A320 cabin (Photo: JetBlue)

On Wednesday, JetBlue unveiled a new cabin interior for its fleet of over 100 Airbus A320 aircraft. The cabin refresh marked the first time that the airline had updated the interior of the A320 aircraft, the airline’s first aircraft type and backbone of the fleet, since the airline’s inception in 2000.

The previous cabin interior was consistent across its fleet of Airbus A320 and, the regional workhorses, Embraer E190s, but not the new Airbus A321 aircraft, which was the first aircraft to move away from JetBlue’s standard interior.

The airline announced the changes will take place over two phases spanning over two years. Phase 1 is currently being implemented across the fleet at a rate of 12 this year with that number increasing next year. The first aircraft to receive the change was N646JB, nicknamed “Bravo-Lima-Uniform-Echo,” the phonetic spelling of “Blue.”

Bravo-Lima-Uniform-Echo flew its first passenger flight on Wednesday with the new interior and was in the air when the announcement regarding the refresh was made, enroute from Boston’s Logan International Airport to Bermuda’s L.F. Wade International Airport.

While JetBlue released a small number of infographics with pictures taken from the actual aircraft, AirlineGeeks was able to obtain photos from one of  Bravo-Lima-Uniform-Echo’s flights, displaying the new interior with passengers onboard.

The view from the rear of the plane; 10.1″ HD touchscreen displays at every seat. (Photo: Gordon Gebert)

Historically, JetBlue A320s have only had 25 rows. However, the new cabin interior allows for an extra row of seating. The airline isn’t one to compromise on legroom so it isn’t likely that the row addition means a reduction in legroom. More likely, the new Space-Flex v2 Galley that JetBlue is aiming to install on its A320 fleet gives the aircraft more room to allow for an extra row of seating.

Modern-styled seat designs and adjustable headrests. Orange lining demarcates Even More Space seats. (Photo: Gordon Gebert)

Instead of the standard grey seats that line the cabins of current JetBlue A320s, the new cabin interior has a more modern look, comparable to the seats of the A321s. Color plays a big role here too, as the color orange is used to demarcate Even More Space seats with an orange lining around the headrest. The headrests are also adjustable, which is a new addition for the A320 fleet.

New branded partitions and orange placards demarcating Even More Space seating. (Photo: Gordon Gebert)

The floor-to-wall partitions are brand new as the current galley/seating partitions does not fully extend from the floor to the wall, it breaks off towards the top exposing, partially, the galley area. Additionally, the current partitions are plain white, while the new ones are branded, similar to other airlines. The partitions increase privacy in the forward galley, the workspace of the flight attendants, while also decrease noise for nearby passengers.

Seating on JetBlue’s retrofitted A320 (Photo: Gordon Gebert)

As mentioned in Wednesday’s announcement, JetBlue aims for the entire A320 fleet to be retrofitted in the new design in three years. Phase 2, which further upgrades the seats, in-flight entertainment and other amenities, will begin in 2019. No plans have been announced for JetBlue’s smaller E190 fleet. However, if JetBlue decides to purchase the E190 E-2, we may be seeing an updated cabin for those aircraft.

Thomas Pallini

Thomas Pallini

Tom has been flying for as long as he can remember. His first flight memory was on a Song Airlines 757 flying from LaGuardia to Orlando. Back then, he was afraid to fly because he thought you needed to jump off the plane in order to get off. Some years later, Tom is now a seasoned traveler, often flying to places just for the fun of it. Most of the time, he'll never leave the airport on his trips. If he's not at home or at work as a Line Service Technician at Long Island MacArthur Airport, he's off flying somewhere, but only for the day.
Thomas Pallini