Photos: Alaska Shows Off a Refreshed Look

Alaska's refreshed look (Photo via Alaska Airline)

Earlier this week, an Alaska Airlines employee posted a photo of what appeared to be a 737 with a refreshed livery on Instagram.

Today, the airline itself posted photos of the aircraft, N549AS, with the refreshed livery on their Facebook page.

With the exception of the winglets, the refreshed livery’s features may be difficult to notice. In the design, one may notice that the primary stripe and logo have been updated to Navy blue, as opposed to the dark blue on the current livery. Also, the secondary stripe has been updated with a vibrant green instead of teal.

In addition, one may notice that the “Alaska” word-mark is modernized. While the Eskimo on the tail is unchanged, the secondary color that originally outlined the tail design is gone.

An Alaska Airlines 737 with split scimitar winglets (Photo by Alec Mollenhauer)
An Alaska Airlines 737 with split scimitar winglets in the current livery | photo provided by Alec Mollenhauer

Finally, the most noticeable feature within Alaska’s refreshed look are the winglets. The winglets themselves have been designed with a “windswept” look, featuring a vibrant green.

As of now, it does not appear that Alaska will be devoting specific time to painting their aircraft in the refreshed look. When the aircraft are due for a fresh coat of paint, according to the airline, they will receive the new look.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153087049027486.1073741869.28488837485&type=1

Photos of the new look:

[Best_Wordpress_Gallery id=”8" gal_title=”Alaskas new look”]

 

*Gallery images via Alaska Airlines

Ryan Ewing
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Ryan Ewing

Ryan founded AirlineGeeks.com back in February 2013 (actually, it was called Aviation Official, but we've changed a bit since then). From being on the yoke of a Piper Navajo, to visiting about Delta's operations center in Atlanta, Ryan has done it all. in 2016, along with American Airlines, Ryan masterminded AAviationDay at more than 10 locations around the world. The smell of jet fumes in the morning along with the countless number of passionate airline employees keep him enthralled in the industry, always seeking more. You can find him helping out travelers at Reagan National Airport near Washington, D.C. when he's not doing something for AirlineGeeks.
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