Security Heightens at Schiphol Amid “Potential Risk”

Photo provided by Capital Photos/KLM

Irregularities started on Saturday evening when the Dutch National Police (Marechaussee) announced tight security measures on Sunday 31. July, due to “a potential risk.” Travelers at AMS were advised to leave early in order to punctually arrive at the airport. It is still unclear what caused this state of alert and neither local government, nor police has given details on the cause.

Due to extra inspections by the police, traffic jams to and from the airport are unsettling travelers. People have been seen getting out of their cars and walking alongside the highways in order to catch their flights in time. On Twitter the National Police request people to “stay in their cars, as getting out can cause dangerous situations.”

At the airport itself things are not going much smoother. KLM has just released a press announcement stating that thousands of suitcases have been stranded. Most likely this will cause problems all through the week, as luggage will be forwarded later.

Even though there was a ground personnel strike announced for today, this should not have affected the loading of suitcases. Ground personnel planned on handing out little gifts and explain why they were on strike. KLM regrets the disruption and states, “We are working with our partners and Schiphol to ensure that the baggage is forwarded to passengers worldwide as quickly as possible.”

Mila Frohn
Follow Mila

Mila Frohn

After getting her Bachelor’s degree in International Business Management, Mila got into a frozen Airline Pilot Transport License (ATPL) training program. Over the course of two years she was ready to fly the big jets. Starting with the Piper Archer and Diamond 40, Mila then moved on to the Piper Seneca V, and later trained on the Boeing 737. Her training took her from Amsterdam to Arizona in the United States, Portugal and back to Amsterdam. With a touch of Oxford, England in between.

Currently you’ll find Mila at her local GA airport near her home in the Netherlands. It’s not unusual to find her hopping in the back of a Cessna 172 or do some work in the simulator. Although her current work is outside the aviation industry, Mila keeps her eyes to the skies and knows she will one day have her place in the left seat of a commercial flight deck.
Mila Frohn
Follow Mila