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Delta, American, and United aircraft at LAX (Photo: AirlineGeeks | James Dinsdale)

Still Stuck in the Back: The Worthlessness of Some Frequent Flyer Status in Today’s Saturated…

Disclaimer: This article contains opinions from the author based on his personal experiences with this topic In 1972, United Airlines, with help from Western Direct Marketing, created the first true airline frequent flyer program. Members received special plaques, among other things, but that was just the beginning. Over the course of the next nine years, new concepts for frequent flyer programs were born. Most died quickly, like American Airlines's proposed program to provide discounted fares to frequent flyers failing to…

Opinion: Despite Huge Ticket Sales, Flybondi’s Dispatch and Management of…

Only a few weeks have passed since Flybondi's first commercial flight, on Jan. 26. Argentina's first indigenous low-cost carrier appeared as a consequence of the governmental impulse to new companies, and obtained a 15-year permission to operate 85 routes, both domestic and international. Its flight booking opening day generated a…

Opinion: Russia’s Checkered History of Aviation Safety (or Lack Thereof)

On Sunday, a Russian Antonov An-148 crashed shortly after takeoff from Moscow Domodedovo International Airport. The crash killed all 65 passengers and 6 crew members onboard. The flight was supposed to be on a routine domestic flight from Moscow to Orsk. The cause of the accident is still under investigation.…

Counter-Opinion: Why We Should Blame Airlines for Shrinking Seats

Last month, my colleague wrote an opinion piece about why we shouldn’t blame airlines for the increasingly reduced seat sizes on planes. While he made some very good points, I have to disagree and take the side against the airlines for why we’re seeing legroom and seat pitch decrease seemingly…

Opinion: Don’t Blame the Airlines for Shrinking Seats

When travelers around the world over purchase tickets on airlines, what makes them pay an additional premium rather than purchase a cheap, economy fare? The answer is simple: comfort and convenience. For those passengers who can afford the extra cost, they are given more legroom, lounge access, expedited security lines, and…

Opinion: Hawaiian Airlines Should Carefully Consider Basic Economy

Hawaiian Airlines is debating introducing basic economy on many of its flights. While basic economy fares have been permeating the US domestic markets through the efforts of the three major domestic carriers, Hawaiian Airlines has been quiet on this topic until now. Basic Economy's Push to Buy Up Airline executives…

Traversing Larger Boundaries: The Ever Expanding Reach of Regional Aircraft

Regional aircraft, the small, less than 100 seat airplanes that we see at small airports across the country, are finding themselves on longer routes. The aircraft were originally offered as a way for airlines to serve short routes with less demand using less fuel-intensive aircraft. However, a new trend has…

Opinion: Cuba Remains a Resiliant Aviation Market

Before U.S. airlines were first allowed to fly to Cuba last year, very little was known about what the market might entail. Last December, I wrote about the saturation of the market with tens of thousands of weekly seats and whether that would prove sustainable for airlines. Then in April,…

Opinion: The Boeing 737 MAX’s Rise to Operating Trans-Atlantic Flights

The Boeing 737 MAX is seen by many as the future of the narrowbody market, along with Airbus' A320neo family. However, it seems that the MAX may be filling a different role: nonstop trans-Atlantic flights. On Sept. 13, Air Canada announced that they would be operating their 737 MAX aircraft…

Opinion: There Is Hope on the Horizon for the Iconic…

In a week which saw further Boeing 747 retirements as airlines continue to modernize their fleets, it continues to look like the Queen of the Skies' days are ever more numbered. This icon of aviation and a favorite of both airlines and passengers since its launch in 1970 has slowly…